Review and renew: facts and goals

Statistics rock! We cannot make proper goals without doing a proper review. Dreams are very nice and all, but unless you plot them with precision, they are not going to come true. This is why I like statistics. I start with statistics so that I can make reasonable goals for the following year. It helps... Continue Reading →

The Scatterling series – 27

In my previous post, I promised you a lot of cow manure when I next wrote. Now, my dear old Dad is very sick, so this is probably a good time to relate how silly we could all be when we were young enough to be called cheeky. He loves this kind of story: REVENGE... Continue Reading →

The Scatterling series – 24, 25 & 26

The coloured bit of paper used when crafting the above image means that I am in planning mode. I say that with a strange sense of victory, since  the commencement of planning coincides with the first free day I have had for months and months. In this very moment my obligations to other people are... Continue Reading →

Greatest Women in Translation: Giselle Chaumien

Difficult texts are one reason I often say that translation is a humbling profession. The other reason is that one comes into contact with translators such as Giselle Chaumien. I found this long interview fascinating.

Carol's Adventures in Translation

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Welcome back to our interview series Greatest Women in Translation! This month the interview is a bit later than usual because yesterday was a local holiday here, so I took the day off. 😉

Please welcome this month’s Greatest Woman in Translation, Giselle Chaumien.

Welcome, Giselle!


GISELLE CHAUMIEN

1.Your mother is German and your father is French. Was your upbringing bilingual at home? If so, how was the experience?

Yes, we spoke both languages at home – with our dogs as well, who understood the commands in both languages. I believe that bilingual upbringing works well only when both parents speak both languages well and use them with the family. Time and again we hear or read that it’s difficult for children, but I can’t confirm that for me and my siblings. My mother told me that we spoke a mishmash of both languages in our first few years, but…

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